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New Work

by Patricia Poore on January 20, 2014

in Revival Today

A Tudoresque living room in a new Arts & Crafts house by architect Edwin C. Heinle. Photo: Bruce Buck

A Tudoresque living room in a new Arts & Crafts house by architect Edwin C. Heinle. Photo: Bruce Buck

The lessons of preservation are evident in new work—lessons that touch on appropriateness, awareness of locale, and respect for the past. The long unacknowledged influence of the Arts & Crafts movement can’t be denied: Arts & Crafts has always been modern. It brings the environment indoors. It is sensitive to local materials and vernacular building traditions. These themes are paramount again today as architects embrace new technology and more environmentally responsible building practices.

Rendering of a “not too big” house designed for its site, a woodland meadow,  by architect Gerald Lee Morosco.

Rendering of a “not too big” house designed for its site, a woodland meadow,
by architect Gerald Lee Morosco.

A recent trend is toward smaller, more naturalistic, more site-specific designs. In many cases, Arts & Crafts-era sensibilities, materials, and construction details play a part in the pleasing appearance of these homes. On the outside, some are near-replica bungalows—not a bad approach when the house is meant to fit into an existing prewar neighborhood.

Still, an Arts & Crafts “style” is notoriously hard to describe. What the houses have in common is the designer’s approach, which responds to the site and also interprets favorite details from a long tradition. A majority of excellent revival houses are the result of a guild-like collaboration among educated client, the designers, the builder and carpenter, and tradespeople. Certain elements recur, among them enveloping rooflines, exaggerated structural elements (battered columns, stone piers, knee braces), porches and open-roofed pergolas, grouped windows and strong horizontals.

A timber-framed porch on stone piers adds tradition to a ranch remodeled by WAI Gorny Design. Photo: Richard McNamee

A timber-framed porch on stone piers adds tradition to a ranch remodeled by WAI Gorny Design. Photo: Richard McNamee

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