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A&C Revival Interiors

by Patricia Poore on December 30, 2014

in Floors, Walls and Ceilings

This Craftsman living room was added to a 1901 house in 1907; simple raw linen curtains admit  the late-afternoon light. Photo: William Wright

This Craftsman living room was added to a 1901 house in 1907; simple raw linen curtains admit the late-afternoon light. Photo: William Wright

Bungalow-era rooms have been described as plain, but they are warm and fully decorated.

Pleated panels of the Morris design ‘Leicester’ hang from rings in the window.

Pleated panels of the Morris design ‘Leicester’ hang from rings in the window.

Wallpaper remained popular during the Arts & Crafts period. Gone was the multi-patterned, tripartite treatment (dado, fill, frieze) of the Victorian era.

The embroidered tabletop linen is recent work, from Ford Craftsman Studios.

The embroidered tabletop linen is recent work, from Ford Craftsman Studios.

Treatments now included panelized walls—with embossed wallcovering, paper, burlap, or stencil designs between moldings or battens. Most popular was the embellished frieze, placed in the area at the top of the wall just under the ceiling. Pendant designs, landscapes, and stylized florals all were common.

Original woodwork was restored by the owners of a modest stone and shingle bungalow in rural New York. Photo: Dan Mayers

Original woodwork was restored by the owners of a modest stone and shingle bungalow in rural New York. Photo: Dan Mayers

By modern standards, interiors were fully decorated, with woodwork, paint, pillows, and rugs adding to the cozy effect. For your home, consider finishing treatments, as well as contemporary textiles that add color, pattern, and warmth to Arts & Crafts rooms.

This room is decorated with period-appropriate nature tones in mossy green, olive and straw yellow. Photo: William Wright

This room is decorated with period-appropriate nature tones in mossy green, olive and straw yellow. Photo: William Wright

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